Are You Ready for Prime Time? How to Deliver Powerful on Camera Interviews

Home/Content Development, Content Marketing, PR Training, Uncategorized/Are You Ready for Prime Time? How to Deliver Powerful on Camera Interviews

Are You Ready for Prime Time? How to Deliver Powerful on Camera Interviews

Giving a press interview (broadcast, radio, or internet based) can be quite daunting if you don’t have experience. Interviews can be stressful because you are potentially talking to millions of people and that kind of reach can make or break your business. The added pressure of being on camera or on air multiplies the stress. However, with the following tips you will be prepared for and be able to make a great impression on the interviewer and the audience.

Press Interview Tips and Best Practices

Interview Preparation: No matter the length or format of your press interview, you have to be prepared. An interview is not the time to be talking off the cuff. The best results occur when you are focused and have the information on hand to make your key points. Focus on what the interview will be about and the two to three what it is you want to talk about break it down into subcategories. Remember interviews go by faster than you may think so keep your subcategories at around three or less. As with any speech consider the audience and the overall news topics that day. Lastly, know who’s interviewing you and also any other guests if you are part of a panel. By knowing the other guests you can research them ahead of time to understand their background and areas of expertise.

Clothing: For on camera events, keep your clothing in line with your line of work, when in doubt, go with a classic style. . Clothing that is too daring or has unusual colors or patterns should be avoided. Also avoid black and white clothing as this gives the visual effect of washing out/draining your skin tone. When accessorizing avoid jewelry that is distracting or overly large as that can distract the audience and cause them to stop paying attention.

Composure: Even if you are nervous, it’s important to put forth the image of confidence. Believe in your knowledge, experience and be yourself. Talk slowly and clearly taking time to breathe. This assures you are being understood and taking regular breaths gives you time to collect your thoughts as you speak. Also be polite, let others speak, and wait your turn. Sit up straight, don’t fidget or make sudden movements.

Be Early: Part of being ready for a press interview is showing up early to get a feel for the set. Get an idea of the set layout and where the cameras are located. Be sure to ask questions such as the location of the restrooms and having water available during your interview to keep your throat from drying out. Practice your points and go over your notes. Don’t be afraid to practice out loud to get an idea of you voice. Check with the producers to see if they are doing hair and makeup or if you should arrive camera ready.
Professional Training: The best way to learn how to handle the media is professional help. Winger Marketing brings 30 years of experience in media relations, press interviews, public relations, and overall marketing and we have just launched our on-site video training and vlogging studio in our Northbrook office. If you want to brush up your interview skills, or want to launch your own online video log – we are here to help. With our expertise you will shine in any interview as you enhance your reputation in the community and marketplace.

About the Author:

With nearly twenty years of media and communications experience, Karolyn Raphael has taken clients from near-obscurity to recognition on a national level. Her work in strategy, media placements, PR training and community outreach includes leading business to business consulting firms, nationally-ranked healthcare systems, national trade associations, local art shows and non-profits. She’s created city-wide awareness campaigns and landed stand-out media placements in local and national news outlets. Karolyn joined the firm in 1997 as an associate and was named President in 2006. She is an advocate of work-life blend and trains team members to think like entrepreneurs.

Leave A Comment